Notification

23 million people in the Horn, East and Central Africa are facing facing severe levels of hunger. Donate now.

Available documents

No available documents


Oxfam Policy & Practice provides free access to Gender & Development and Development in Practice journal articles.

Download from publisher

Overview

Increasingly, cash-crop production is overtaking traditional subsistence farming in India. The Government, development workers, banks and financial institutions are pushing cash cropping as leading to greater yield, higher earnings, and raised living standards. But the shift is bad news for small producers and women farmers. Payment is now in cash rather than in kind. Whereas in kind payments were equal for men and women, women receive less cash than men. Their real income is not increasing, because cash crops require more investment than subsistence farming. Families are eating less, lower quality food, and the use of pesticides cause sickness. Rajamma explores these, and other, problems.

This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis. For the full table of contents for this and previous issues of this journal, please visit the Gender and Development website.

Additional details

Author(s)

Publisher(s)

Editor(s)

DOI

10.1080/09682869308519976

How to cite this resource

Citation styles vary so we recommend you check what is appropriate for your context.  You may choose to cite Oxfam resources as follows:

Author(s)/Editor(s). (Year of publication). Title and sub-title. Place of publication: name of publisher. DOI (where available). URL

Our FAQs page has some examples of this approach.

Related resources

Here are similar items you might be interested in.

Browse all resources